Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSCR)

Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSCR)

The macula is the small central area located at the back of the eye responsible for providing detailed, “straight-ahead” vision. In central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR), fluid accumulates under the macula, much like a fluid blister, and can disrupt the light-sensitive cells in the macula. Central vision is variably affected by CSCR. Some patients report no symptoms or only mild blurring of their central vision. In more severe cases, there can be a significantly noticeable blurred grey central patch.

CSCR most commonly affects males between 20 and 50 years of age, and is often associated with a recent or current episode of increased stress. A hormone known as cortisol is released from the adrenal cortex to help the body deal with stress, and this may be partially responsible for triggering CSCR. Similarly, people with a history of corticosteroid medication use are more likely to develop CSCR. The majority of CSCR cases resolve spontaneously over 3-4 months without any intervention, and vision returns to normal or near-normal. However, if this does not occur then further treatment by your retinal specialist may be required.